Posts Tagged ‘ accessories ’

More Wine(ing) To Come

Corky is on the job as we speak!

Partners In Wine Club Press will be bringing you new and updated information on the marriage of food, wine, technology, and social media…

Both Chef Elizabeth Stelling and Adrienne Turner are attending classes, meeting with wine producers, and getting ready for Wine Art Music Poetry Project, and will begin regular posting soon…

Letting Wine Breathe

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Decanting A Few Good Wines

English glass maker George Ravenscroft is credited for the 1676 discovery of how to make lead crystal. Most wine decanters were initially made of glass or lead crystal, both of which allowed the person who decanted the wine to see the sediment and avoid pouring it into the decanter, as well into your wine glass.

As the demand for bottled wine grew, so did a parallel industry for the manufacture of decanters. Whereas decanters had originally been used purely to serve a function, manufacturers began to create new and more sophisticated designs, as decanters were recognized for their decorative potential.

One cannot have too many decanters. If you are going to do any kind of tasting event in your home involving more than one bottle of vintage wine- it would be wise to purchase more than one decanter.

Crystal decanters manufactured in England and Ireland during the period between 1760 and 1810 are considered among the finest of classic decanters. They were manufactured before the advent of machine production, and were hand-blown, hand-engraved and hand-cut, and therefore, each was a complete original.

Involved in the American Wine Society I have seen on many occasion the need for two or even three decanters. Wines, such as big Bordeaux or even a Pinot Noir benefits from breathing and can sit for up to three hours. Each passing minute the wine takes on a new life, even in the glass you will notice subtle notes on the nose, tongue and finish.

Decanters can range from $20 to $200, or even more, but one nice decorative for show and a few less expensive glass decanters will suffice. Guests who enjoy wine care more about how the wine is affected than whether you are pouring out of Bacarat lead crystal.

More on decanter history

Chef Elizabeth Stelling Food and Wine Writer Food ~ Wine ~ Fun!

Other Wine Glasses and Decanter History

Market Monday- Summer Sexy Beach Drinks

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Summer, Pink & Sexy

While out on a typical Partners In Wine Club Press’s hunt for ‘Wine Special’, ‘Must Buy’ Wine Bargains, and a need for Wine Tasting Event space a glimpse of the cutest pink package marketing genius caught my eye! Normally you see I am not the pink sort of gal- no blush wine for me, but this product NUVO L’ESPIRIT Liqueur gave me an idea.

Corky convinced us to purchase a bottle, and we went home and had a nip. Tasting notes: slight sweet with a hint of Vodka and a bubbly finish martini style.

Product marketing (on-line) billed as ‘…a lifestyle choice for friendly individuals. Much more than your average spirit, NUVO is the ultimate accessory for any get-together’.

Exactly what went through my head when I first saw this product!

Okay, normally this orange zest loving chef might not endorse a product of this nature, but I endorse fun, with responsible drinking morals. NUVO screamed premiere and SWAG, I felt like this would be great for bridal showers, girlie party gifts, over crushed ice with an umbrella at your next BBQ party, and you might even see me out New Year’s Day, 2011 with mine chilled and a straw right down in the bottle- my go bite the hair of the dog remedy!

I have to share this with my friend Leila, she is going to love this…

Chef Elizabeth Stelling, Owner/Chef- CookAppeal, LLC Princeton-New Jersey Food ~ Wine ~ Fun! Restaurant Reviews

Pretty In Pink!

Market Monday- Cork 101, Why Cork Is Perfect For Our Wine

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For years hearing about how the cork forests have been depleted, and believing that we would be better off using synthetic corks, and screw caps down the road has our attention at PIWC, but in all honesty why have we not looked into it ourselves. Do we believe what someone tells us, or is there a good reason we have ‘Education’ on our side?

PIWC will be showing you why Cork is- Natural, Sustainable, Environmentally and Ecologically Friendly

First you must understand why, what, and where Cork is in our market-

WHY:

There is no other material, either natural or man made, with all of the characteristics that are unique to raw cork: light weight, rot resistant, non-toxic, good compression and expansion, fire resistant, impermeable, soft, and buoyant. Besides these remarkable qualities, cork bark is also a sustainable, renewable, and environmentally friendly natural resource. Cork bark is “stripped” off the cork oak trees at appropriate intervals without damage to the trees and allows new bark to grow in its place so there is no harm to nature, no trees are cut or destroyed, no disturbance of flora and fauna … and yet a whole industry flourishes from this very unique raw material. Besides the many other products listed, all of which are produce from cork bark, Jelinek also supplies large quantities of cork bark in its raw and natural form for a variety of products and purposes:

Corkwood is the raw material used by all cork manufacturers in the production of the majority of cork products, including natural wine corks and other natural cork stoppers and products. Corkwood is sorted by quality and thickness, boiled, pressed flat and aged appropriately with controlled moisture so it is “production ready”. Corkwood is sold in truckload or container quantities, packed in standard bale sizes and weights.

Virgin Cork Bark is bark obtained from the very first two harvests of a cork tree. The rougher, less uniformed and more “natural” surface appearance and texture of the bark from these initial harvests are easily distinguished from the smoother texture of subsequent harvests from which corkwood is yielded. Diverse industries utilize virgin bark.

Cork Characteristics

Lightness
Cork is light and will float. Beneficial for buoys, floats, fishing rod handles, level gauges. Light weight makes cork an excellent filler material for many products. Perfect for shoe insoles and soles.

Elasticity
The cellular membranes are flexible so that the cork can be fitted against the wall of a bottle under pressure (the airin the cork cells is compressed, reducing volume) and when released bounces back to its original form. Perfect as a stopper, perfect for floor tiles and wall tiles.

Impermeability
Cork does not rot due to the suberin which makes it impermeable to gases and liquids.
Combined with corks other characteristics it is the ideal material for bottle stoppers, gasket sealers, joint fillers, floor underlayment, and bulletin boards.

Low Conductivity
Gaseous elements in cork are sealed in tiny cell like compartments insulated and separated from each other. This provides for low conductivity to heat, sound and vibrations. One of the best insulating and acoustical capacities of all substances.
Resistance to Wear

The honeycomb structure of suberose surface gives cork a high friction coefficient and makes it very durable. It does not absorb dust and is fire resistant in its natural state. Ideal material for all building products, including floor and wall tiles, cork wallpaper, rolls, and sheets.
Cork products contribute extremely favorably to the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Green Rating System. Cork is a 100% sustainable and renewable natural resource.

Information found and used by permission at Jelinek Cork Group

Recycle Cork in your area at local Whole Food Markets, a join effort with ReHarvet Cork.com

Market Monday- No CorkScrew?

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For Your Entertainment…

PIWC Thought it would be fun to show this video on how people have found a way to open wine bottles with no corkscrew…

We do not recommend this, nor endorse this video or its persons- bottles are made of glass, can cut you, and can harm you if the cork hits you or others in the eye! ~ PIWC

Market Monday- Swissmar

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Filter, decant, and aerate all in one step with this convenient decanting funnel. This has been one of the most used gadgets in our house.

The most recent uses was when hubby opened an old bottle of Grand Marnier, and the cork fell to pieces, most of it went inside the bottle. So each time we have a sip we now have a nice strainer to keep even the tiniest pieces of sediment or cork separate from the liquid.

Company is impressed as it also aerates the wine as you decant aged wines for breathing purposes, or the last few drops into your awaiting glass.
Swissmar Decanting Wine Funnel, 6-hole Stem with Stand are available for $20 on Amazon.com.

Our Swissmar Decanting Wine Funnel, 6-hole Stem with Stand is not so shiny and new as seen in advertisements, but you can bet we will enjoy this gadget for years to come!

Chef E Stelling, Chef/Owner- CookAppeal, LLC @ Food ~ Wine ~ Fun!

Market Monday- Mingle Plates

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Now here’s a little gadget we’re sure every wine savvy, or vinophile tasting geek needs. The ‘Mingle plate‘ aka  cocktail plate. It allows you to keep one hand free while eating and win(e)ing.

This little accessory is ideal for any wine tasting,  but face it, no one wants to spend the extra cash on gadgets these days. However they are worth the money spent! How cool is it to have effortless eating and drinking at a party (like eating  and drinking should be an effort!)

Chef E and her hubby own quite a few of these, and used them back in Dallas when she owned a public wine and food pairing company- The Cork Screws, and are never on a tasting scene with out them. The Dallas Food and Wine Festival back in the day passed them out, before even good wine glasses were chic, so her and hubby are a little surprised not many on the east coast has caught on to ‘Mingle Plates’ at tasting events.

I know these are cool. I’ve seen Chef E and hubby  in action with these little babies. I’ve actually seen Chef E use one of these gadgets at a dinner party with her  iPhone at the some time. Now how cool is that. She was like a Rock Star in action, and didn’t even know it.

Cheers and Tweets!

Adrienne Turner , PIWC

Chef E, PIWC

Alternative ‘Vino Plate Clips’, as well as ‘Mingle Plates’, Cocktail Plates with glass holder can be found in wine retail stores, or on-line- Crate & Barrel

Sunday Calendar-

Ah yes, as Adrienne wrote- it seems as if Spring has arrived and I had a beautiful day in NYC to report! The Rainbow Book Fair was wonderful, and I had the chance to eat at an eatery that has been open for a year, but reservations are hard to come by! Momofuku in East Village are more accessible, and the experience was wonderful! The report will be up this week, with a wine pairing, along with other wonderful news! ~ Chef E Stelling

"corky"

Weekly Calendar– PIWC will be posting weekly must haves, tasting notes, events, and happenings at the beginning of each week. Here you will find the hot new wine, food, beer, and spirit news PIWC can bring to our readers. ‘Corky’ is out on the streets doing his best investigative reporting on all subjects!

Sip and Twit Event, The Wine Loft, Long Branch, NJ- Event Details Are Still Available to read!

Market Monday

What is a ‘Mingle Plate’? …and why should you own one?

Tasting Tuesday-

Each week PIWC will feature Guest Writers, and Restaurant Reviews- either industry professionals or fantastic blogs we feel you need to discover!

This week Food Beer Blog Writer, Chef Fresco is going to share some thoughts on a beer of choice…

Wine Down Wednesday-

Chef E shares weekly food and wine pairings- ‘Momofuk-gasmic’ Momofuku: Noodle Bar & Milkbar

Thirsty Thursday-

Wine Enthusiast and writer Adrienne Turner will share bottle notes from her cellar down under…

Frugal Friday-

‘Corky’ will bring you a list of must have bargain wines…

Simply Saturday-

PIWC will present local food, wine, art, and other must attend related events for the upcoming week…

If readers have any questions or information they are seeking about related subject matter, please let us know. We will try to find out, and answer your questions from our own experience, or seek out other professionals we can refer you to!

Does The Glass Make The Wine? Glass Reviews

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We KNEW when we opened the Ravenscroft stemware boxes they were keepers. Light weight, slim and trim crystal that did not tip over easily when filled or otherwise. The Tinsele strength and yield seemed to be in good order.

Stemware Comparison:

* Ravenscroft Chardonnay- Great bouquet, room to swirl, light crystal, beautiful stemware- Wine: Newton Chardonnay
* Ravenscroft Bordeaux- Good bouquet, room to swirl, light crystal, beautiful stemware- Wine: Pinot Noir

The entire testing crew felt up against the Reidel, they were great- although the-

  • Riedel Vinum Extreme out weighed the Ravenscroft Bordeaux on all accounts, but apples to apples it was not contest.
  • Oregon Pinot Noir stemware were purchased in Oregon, purpose- New World Pinot Noir, no comparison!
  • For a beginner set of wine glasses, or if you do not want to spend the money for more expensive stemware available on the market, we give them a thumbs up!
  • Even compared to the restaurant quality stemware we own for catering and Stemless Riedel glasses we own, and the glasses offered (stemless) at the restaurant- thumbs up! The stemless glasses made the Chardonnay taste like water- no bouquet, mouth feel, or finish was comparable- like water?

You may purchase these glasses soon through our Partners In Wine Club on-line market, but if you would like to purchase a set now for a gift, email: info@partnersinwineclub.com, and I will set you up!

Visit Chef E @ Food ~ Wine ~ Fun! for more information on wines

  • The light weight feel of the Ravenscroft were more appealing to the heaviness/bulkiness of the other glasses
  • Some of those claims seem overstated, even to practiced palates. “It can be overdone,” says Robert Parker, who relies on one glass – the $23 Zinfandel glass in the Vinum line made by Riedel – to taste most reds, whites and even champagnes. Moreover, Parker said some of the fancy glasses, such as balloon-shaped vessels that can hold 37 ounces, are too big.

    “The proper air-to-wine ratio is 3-to-1,” said Parker. Some of those balloon glasses are so big, you have to pour most of a full bottle in the glass to get that ratio, he said.

    We want to hear what glass you find gives you the best tasting wine, because it basically comes down the what tools you use. We feel the biggest price tag does not make it a great experience, but the cheapest glasses may not give you room to swirl, sniff, and optimum tasting room if the bowls are too small- A good mid-range glass like Ravenscroft is worth a try.

    Our final vote on ‘Does The Glass Make The Wine’- Depending on what you are looking for in stemware for yourself or guests, take the test at home. There are differences in the way the wine bouquet leaves the glass as our noses enter the opening, the way the wine lands on our palates, and hits the back of the mouth in the drinking process. This can be an individual taste, but overall many agree if one plans to enjoy wine, then spend a few extra bucks and guzzle in style…yes I said guzzle in style!

    Disclaimer: The glasses were provided as a gift to try through CSN Stores

    Market Monday- Wine Preservation

    We all at one time or another, more often weekly found ourselves wanting to relax and open a bottle of wine. After one, or possibly two glasses and time for bed, or errands, we have a need to re-cork the bottle? So often and after years of seeing our parents doing the same thing, we just push the cork back in as deep as it will go leave it on the counter for the next evening. NO NO NO!

    There are two problems with this- after years of learning that leaving air inside the bottle to continue oxidation, and not properly chilling the contents we are creating vinegar. An off tasting glass of wine in the next few days will be a  put off to most taste buds (imagine offering this to your friends, possibly an enemy!). Returning to the joys of enjoying earths great juice, the gift of Bacchus, should be a good experience.

    Every well stocked bar needs a supply of bottle stoppers and pourers to extend the flavor of life of a good or not so great bottle of wine. There are many options of preserving wine, but our feelings are that if one has only a few ounces left- then why not spread the joy and split the last few ounces. That is unless you have over indulged, and exceeded the legal limits allowed to drive home. Half of a bottle left, or even two thirds then you should do what you can to preserve the luscious juice of the vine for the next day.

    Preserving wine was only intended for a day or so, but we have actually experienced a bottle of Repasso from a recent wine tasting that was still singing to your taste buds seven days later, that of course is rare. Finding the right solution to the problem of preserving wine if you are only wanting to indulge or share in a glass of wine does not have to be as daunting as one might think. Below we list a variety of preservation methods, and in the next few weeks will be sharing information on the history of wine preservation and way into the development of products/gadgets that help make our lives so much easier.

    We have contacted various industry pros and their companies, and will be bringing you wine industry news first hand!

    Options in Wine Preservation:

    • Re-corking the bottle- not a good choice for champagne/sparkling wine due to expansion of the cork from pressure, and sealing in air to continue oxidation
    • Decorative Bottle Stoppers– sold in most wine and regular markets- temporary and only bottle bling
    • Glass top decanter cork stoppers- temporary and designed in the packaging of spirits to keep air particles, moister and debris from spoiling contents; decanters are designed to temporarily hold aged reds for breathing purposes; until the wine is immediately consumed
    • Vacu Vin Wine Saver & Stoppers- removes the air the damages the wine by continuing  the oxidization, thus destroying any remaining wine. Sterile marbles were discovered, by adding them to a half bottle until it reaches the bottle neck, and then using the Vacu Vin to remove any remaining air, and placing in cool storage.
    • Half Bottle Method– This is the lowest tech, maybe even a traditional method. Pour wine into a half bottle, fill near the top, and cork it. (Pouring itself aerates and helps change the wine. Remember always to refrigerate. Cold preserves).
    • Gas- There are a variety of solutions in which gases, such as nitrogen are pumped into the wine to replace harmful oxygen. These work about as well as the methods above, more or less, but cost money and require replenishment of supplies. The consumer models don’t work as well as the big restaurant models.

    Next weeks ‘Market Monday- Wine Preservation’ will discuss ‘History of Wine, and the Development of Wine Preservation’, with additions of our own incites on the subject…

    Quick Facts About Cork

    . natural product
    . unique characteristics
    . unparalleled properties
    . environmentally friendly
    . renewable resource
    . steady supply

    . managed healthy forests …we will be sharing a big concern- ‘Is There A Cork Shortage’?